Blackberry-Port Jam

I got the idea for this jam from Camilla of Culinary Adventures with Camilla fame. She was knee deep in olallieberry season at the time and was posting all sorts of wonderful berry recipes. Granted, I had no idea what an olallieberry was, but it looked to me like it was very similar to a blackberry.

I saved this recipe and her idea for Olallieberry-Port jam the first of June and just bided my time until blackberry season arrived.

(For Camilla’s original recipe, click here.   You might also want to check out her Trio of Summer Jams.)

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Old port….luckily, no floaties. 🙂

I happened to have a very aged bottle of port.   In fact, the winery is no longer in business and I was very careful when taking out the cork.      It smelled OK, tasted OK, and I didn’t see any “floaties.”   “Besides,” I thought, “I am going to boil the heck out of it!”

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Local blackberries.

Moving along, I combined Camilla’s idea with a recipe from my hero and the Queen of Jam, Rachel Saunders.

Blackberry-Port Jam
based on Olallieberry-Port Jam by Camilla and Blackberry Jam with Lemon-Basil by Rachel Saunders

3 1/2 lbs. fresh blackberries (about 3 quarts)
1 3/4 lbs. white cane sugar
3 oz. freshly squeezed orange juice
2/3 c. port

Combine all ingredients in a large kettle.   Using a potato masher, mash about half the berries as you stir in the sugar, juice and port.  Heat slowly, stirring, and bring to a boil.   After it reaches a bowl, stir often and boil for 15-20 minutes.   Be careful not to scorch the jam.   After 15 minutes, start checking for doneness.    You can go to Rachel’s site to see her frozen spoon method.   I just cook until “jammy.”

After it has reached the “jammy” state, skim off any foam if necessary.    Carefully pour hot jam into sterilized jars and seal with sterilized lids and bands.     “Gently tap the bottoms of the jars on the counter to release any air bubbles” (tip from Camilla).

Process in a water bath for 10-15 minutes.   Carefully remove  and let sit undisturbed until jars seal.   Just wait and you will start hearing popping sounds all afternoon.

This recipes makes about eight half-pint  jars.   (I did have to use two of my fake “vintage blue” pint jars.)

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I love the shape of these jars, especially for gifts.

For other great jam recipes from or inspired by Rachel Saunders and her most awesome Blue Chair Jam Cookbook, see below.      And, a big thank you to Camilla for this inspired idea.

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Love these vintage labels.

 “Put a bird on it!”

If you are a fan of Portlandia, you will get this reference.   If not, let me  simply tell you about these great Avery labels (#22808).   You too can make funky, vintage labels for your jam, jelly and canned-goods this summer.  (This label was made with Avery’s template maker.)

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The elusive shrimp plant.

Abigail, your virtual flower for today is a little odd.   You may have them where you live, but I can only grow these during the summer months.    I fell in love with them in the rain forest exhibit at our local zoo and I try to grow one every summer.

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My Favorite Reads

Eat, Pray, Love
Running with Scissors
SantaLand Diaries
Me Talk Pretty One Day
Angela's Ashes
Naked
Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim
Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly
My Life in France
Julie and Julia: 365 Days, 524 Recipes, 1 Tiny Apartment Kitchen: How One Girl Risked Her Marriage, Her Job, and Her Sanity to Master the Art of Living
Garlic and Sapphires: The Secret Life of a Critic in Disguise
A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes from My Kitchen Table
Tender at the Bone: Growing Up at the Table
The Liars' Club
Code Name Verity
The Paris Wife
The Shoemaker's Wife
The Secret Book of Frida Kahlo: A Novel
Brother of the More Famous Jack
Burying the Honeysuckle Girls


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