What do Linnaeus and Monet have in common with Tulsa?

The In-Laws were here two weekends ago and Mom was here this past weekend.   To  entertain both sets of parents, we showed them the same sites around Tulsa, just on different weekends.

Linnaeus Teaching Garden is truly a grass roots effort, no pun intended.   It was built with donated money, supplies, and  labor and is staffed by volunteers.   It is free to the public.

Every time we go we come away with another idea.   (My MiL was super excited to visit because she had read about it in Southern Living.)

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How I would love a wood carving like this in our yard. I could have taken twenty pictures of this sculpture from the fox peeking out to the bunny at the base. Notice the state bird of Oklahoma, the scissortail flycatcher.

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This garden is about ten years old, but they have taken great pains to make it look like it has been there for years and years.

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Especially the water garden and ponds. They look like they were built decades ago.

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The plantings seem so natural to me.

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I could just sit and listen to the water and bird sounds for hours.

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There are a number of water features in the garden. I love this more formal approach.

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This archway leads to the vegetable and herb gardens.

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Basil Boulevard

A very formally edged thyme, marjoram, and oregano garden.  Love this idea!

A very formally edged thyme, marjoram, and oregano garden. Love this idea!

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Also love this trellis of gourds.

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And this pot of chives.

And, I must get one of these dwarf pomegranates!

And, I must get one of these dwarf pomegranates!

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Linnaeus stands at the entrance and greets all visitors.

I can’t tell you how beautiful this garden is and how helpful the volunteers are.  They are eager to share their knowledge and expound on the beauty of this Tulsa treasure.

After we visited the gardens, we headed to Philbrook for a spectacular exhibit, Monet and the Seine.    I have now seen this exhibit twice and would happily go again.

Monet

Spectacular.

My favorite of the entire exhibit (from both visits) has to be this:

willows

Claude Money
The Willows, 1880
Oil on canvas
The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
Edward C. and Mary Walker Collection

There was actually a silent film of Monet painting in his own garden (to continue my garden theme).

And finally, a visit to Philbrook would not be complete without a stroll around the extensive formal garden.

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I am sure there are fairies and elves hiding here somewhere.

 

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I’m not sure what was fuzzing up all the boxwoods. It was either web worms or more likely cotton wood “dandruff.”

I would love to be your tour guide if you are ever in the Tulsa area.   There are even more gardens to explore.

18 comments to What do Linnaeus and Monet have in common with Tulsa?

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